Queen Elizabeth is 90 Years Young Today! To Celebrate, Enjoy Some QE2 Fun Facts!

April 21, 2016 in News, Queens of World History, The Tudor Thomases by Beth von Staats

.

Queen Elizabeth II, the United Kingdom of Great Britain’s Longest Reigning Monarch God Save the Queen!

Queen Elizabeth II, the United Kingdom of Great Britain’s Longest Reigning Monarch, is 90 years old today.
God Save the Queen! Long May She Reign!

_________________________________

“I declare before you all that my whole life whether it be long or short shall be devoted to your service and the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong.”
– Princess Elizabeth, later Queen Elizabeth II, on her 21st Birthday –

_________________________________

Today, Her Majesty Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith, turns 90 years old. How will she celebrate?  A walk-about and lunch with President Barack Obama, along with lighting the first of 1000 bonfires to commemorate her 90 years, awaits Her Majesty. In other words, the Queen will continue to fulfill her promise to her subjects. Today, like any other throughout her long reign, will be a day in service to the realm.

How will Queenanneboleyn.com honor Her Majesty? Well, like any other day here on the website, we will make an attempt to educate and entertain our browsers. So, within that spirit, here are several “fun facts” about Queen Elizabeth II:

Thomas Cromwell (Artist: Hans Holbein the Younger)

Thomas Cromwell
(Artist: Hans Holbein the Younger)

1. Folks, this is a Tudor Era themed website, so it will interest our members and regular browsers to know that Her Majesty is not only a direct descendant of Mary Boleyn Carey Stafford, sister of Queen Anne Boleyn, but rumor has it she may also be a direct descendant of Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex through her mother’s lineage. Gregory wasn’t so dumb after all.

2. We are very fortunate Her Majesty is with us and that the Queen Mum graced the realm for so many years. In an age where such surgery was very complex and risky, Queen Elizabeth II was born by cesarean section.

3. Like Queen Anne Boleyn did before her, Her Majesty speaks fluent French.

Queen Elizabeth II with President Jimmy Carter

Queen Elizabeth II with U.S. President Jimmy Carter

4. Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Bernie Sanders are competing to become the 13th President of the United States to hold office since the Queen’s ascension to the throne.

5. Are you a friend or follower of the Queen? She joined Facebook in February 2010.

6. Just how committed is the Defender of the Faith? Pope Francis is the seventh pontiff to lead the world’s Roman Catholic Church while Her Majesty has reigned as Queen of England.

7. Her Majesty is a generous and thoughtful boss. She selects personalized Christmas gifts for all of her staff, including gifting over 90,000 Christmas puddings.

8. There are some very lucky English subjects out there. Thirty call the Queen their godmother.

9. With everyone debating whether a surviving portrait of Queen Anne Boleyn exists, there are at least 130 portraits of Queen Elizabeth II!

10. Write this down for your next game of Trivial Pursuit. Queen Elizabeth II is the first British monarch to visit China.

Queen Elizabeth II and Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury

Queen Elizabeth II and Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury

11. The Queen’s crown is certainly Imperial. Not only is she a monarch of a Commonwealth of Nations, but Her Majesty left a message for those who may someday venture to the moon.

12. Read, mark, learn and inwardly digest. Justin Welby is the Queen’s seventh Archbishop of Canterbury.

13. Secretary Hillary Clinton has nothing over the Queen regarding her access to the world wide web. Her Majesty sent her first email in 1976.

14. Everyone knows the Queen loves corgis. How many have shared their home with her? At last count, Her Majesty has included at least thirty corgis and four dorgis in her family. What is a dorgi?  A new dog breed Her Majesty created.

15. Caroline Kennedy loved her pony, Macaroni, but not as much Princess Elizabeth loved her Shetland pony, Peggy.

Queen Elizabeth's Horse Wins Historic Gold Cup At Royal Ascot

Queen Elizabeth’s Horse “Estimate” Wins Historic Gold Cup At Royal Ascot

16. There is the great Triple Crown-winning racehorse American Pharoah, and then there are the horses Her Majesty breeds at the royal studs. They are spectacular. The Queen’s horses won races at Royal Ascot on a number of occasions, four winners during Ascot week 1957 alone.

17. You know nothing, Jon Snow. Though Her Majesty visited the Iron Throne in Game of Thrones, she resisted the urge to sit upon it.

18. Salute! Queen Elizabeth II is Great Britain’s first and only female royal to serve in the military.

19. Do you have a flat tire on your car or truck? No problem, Her Majesty knows how to change it. Spark plugs are no challenge for her, either.

20. During World War II, the Queen and her sister Princess Margaret lived at Windsor Castle, where the royal jewels were hidden in the castle dungeons stored in hat boxes.

21. Step aside, Thomas Cranmer and King Edward VI. Queen Elizabeth II will be the last reigning monarch to be “home schooled”, her religious education provided by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

22. The ultimate letter writer, Her Majesty has answered over 3.5 million, yes million, items of correspondence. Britons married 60 years or celebrating their 100th birthdays receive a personalized telegram.

Prince George of Cambridge

Prince George of Cambridge

23. Awwwwwwwwww, how cute is this? Prince George of Cambridge calls Her Majesty “Gan Gan”. I would not suggest trying this title yourself.

24. Need change for a ten-pound note? If asking the Queen, she will only be able to oblige on Sunday, the only day she carries cash. The Church of England exempts no one.

25. Anyone have an umbrella handy? It poured buckets the day of Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation.

26. Maundy Thursday was expensive this year! Tradition dictates the Queen share bags of “Maundy Money” with as many subjects as she is old.

27. Do have sympathy for the Queen. For an hour a week, she is compelled to meet with the Prime Minister — twelve different power hungry personalities during her reign.

28. The Queen of England’s wedding gown was exquisite. Even so, like everyone else in Britain at the time, she needed to save her ration coupons to pay for it.

Photographer Queen Elizabeth

Photographer Queen Elizabeth

29. Although the paparazzi is a frustrating fact of life Her Majesty struggles with daily, she herself is an avid photographer.

30. When in England, be careful to pay homage to the swans. They all belong to Her Majesty, every last one of them. No wonder they are so cheeky.

31. When your image is on money and you rule the realm, there is no need for formalities. Queen Elizabeth has no passport, car registrations, or driver’s license.

32. Though 90 years old, Her Majesty is a modern woman. She does not carry her husband’s name.

33. Queen Elizabeth II is one brave woman who is calm under pressure. In 1982, she woke up one morning to find a stalker sitting at the edge of her bed. Her Majesty engaged the intruder in conversation about his family for ten minutes before a footman finally roused and seized the man.

34. Cymru am Byth! The Queen’s wedding ring is made from a nugget of Welsh gold. King Henry VII would be pleased.

35. The Queen is a busy woman! She is the patron of over 600 charitable organizations! Not only that, in 2015, she attended more official engagements than HRHs Prince Charles, Prince of Wales; Prince William, Duke of Cambridge; and Katherine, Duchess of Cambridge, combined!

_________________________________

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN!!

Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II

LONG MAY SHE REIGN!!

_________________________________

Elizabeth II, Queen of “The Greatest Generation”

September 9, 2015 in 2015 Tribute to Queen Elizabeth II, Queens of World History by Beth von Staats

By Beth von Staats

_________________________________

Queen Elizabeth II, the United Kingdom of Great Britain’s Longest Reigning Monarch God Save the Queen!

Queen Elizabeth II, the United Kingdom of Great Britain’s Longest Reigning Monarch

_________________________________

“I declare before you all that my whole life whether it be long or short shall be devoted to your service and the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong.”
– Princess Elizabeth, later Queen Elizabeth II, on her 21st Birthday –

_________________________________

Video Credit: Maestro Stokowski, You Tube

_________________________________

Aided by ascension to the throne at a young age, the wonders of modern medicine, a culture heralding tradition as a core value, and most pointedly a steadfast call to duty, Queen Elizabeth II today becomes the United Kingdom’s longest reigning monarch – not just for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland combined, but also each individually, history heralding back a millennium. Her Majesty, Elizabeth the Second, is not only Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, and Defender of the Faith by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and of Her other Realms and Territories, but she is also our anointed Queen of “The Greatest Generation” – the beloved Queen a full partner of those men, women and children for whom the rest of us owe our freedom, and for many of us, our very lives.

The then Princess Elizabeth held by her father,  then Prince Albert, Duke of York.

The then Princess Elizabeth held by her father, then Prince Albert, Duke of York.

Born to Prince Albert Frederick Arthur George, Duke of York and his delightful Duchess, once the beloved Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, Her Majesty the Queen was not born to reign. She and her younger sister Margaret were the children of the “spare to the throne”, not the heir. Initially, this was quite fortunate indeed. Unable to verbally articulate due to a profound stammer, Her Majesty’s father was once ill equipped to reign in a age where one communicated directly to the realm via speeches in large forums and worldwide by radio. Through one of Great Britain’s greatest a twists of fate, however, not only through exhaustive therapy did the Duke of York overcome his demons, but he also overcame the demons of his brother, a man who chose his personal desires over duty. Thus, upon the abdication of King Edward VIII, the Duke of York suddenly became King George VI and Princess Elizabeth, heir presumptive.

The Victoria Cross is awarded for supreme courage, a disregard for danger and complete devotion to duty.

The Victoria Cross is awarded for supreme courage, disregard for danger and complete devotion to duty.

“For Valour.” These two words penned originally to the Victoria Cross appropriately defined the monarchy of Queen Elizabeth II’s father, so much so that Sir Winston Churchill penned them once again upon a note laid with the Government wreath accompanying the King’s casket. King George VI’s reign was short, but through His Majesty’s example of courage and fortitude, along with that of his remarkable wife, Great Britain galvanized with a shared strength of purpose during the dire years of World War II. In a generation where “all gave some, and some gave all”, as everyone did around her, through the example and steadfast support of her parents, the then Princess Elizabeth “rolled up her sleeves” to do the work that needed to be done to win a war so crucial to preserve a nation, to preserve an empire, to preserve a way of life going back a millennium.

Princess Elizabeth (left) and Princess Margaret (right) as Girl Guides

Princess Elizabeth (left) and Princess Margaret (right) as Girl Guides

World War II erupted while the then 13 year old Princess Elizabeth was vacationing at Balmoral, Scotland with her sister and parents on 3 September 1939. Obviously, King George and Queen Elizabeth rushed to London. Their children initially remained in relative safety at Balmoral cared for by their nanny and governess, along with other royal staff. With the war concentrating for the moment on the European mainland, the Royal Family spent the holidays as usual at Sandringham. Once the King and Queen returned to London, however, Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret took up residence at the Royal Lodge in Windsor Great Park. Members of the Girl Guides, they continued forward with as normal childhoods as their royal status and the war would allow.

British children board a ship on their way to Canada.

British children board a ship on their way to Canada.

It was during the early months of 1940 that discussions took place regarding the safeguarding of the Royal Family, particularly Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret. Moving the girls to Canada for the duration of the war or at the very least to Wales or Northern Scotland were all options “on the table”. Had King George VI decided to safeguard his daughters and in doing so also safeguard the succession by moving them to a safe haven, no one would have found fault with it. Instead, Queen Elizabeth famously explained to the realm her thoughts on the matter, “… the children could not go without me, and I could not possibly leave the King, and the King will never leave.” With that so pointedly decided, by May 1940, official announcements declared the girls were living in a “house in the country”. Instead, the Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret were safeguarded for the remaining duration of the war within the walls of Windsor Castle, it’s deepest dungeons, as well as caves dug into the hillside by King George III, used as air raid sheltering. How the Princesses felt while holed up in a dungeon or a cave while bombs fell on London can only be imagined.

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visit Londoners after aircraft bombings of the city.

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visit Londoners after aircraft bombings of the city.

Sharing Windsor Castle with a Grenadier Guards company, Princess Elizabeth began her now life-long call to service, sharing meals and playing the royal host. Though the castle was gloomy, it’s contents protected from possible bombing damage (including the royal jewels being stored in hat boxes within the castle vaults), the Royal Family made the most of a downright dangerous situation, the King and Queen visiting their children on weekends. Nearly killed themselves during a bombing raid on Buckingham Palace, the King and Queen continued their royal duties, raising morale visiting British subjects displaced by bombing raids, British troops, and munition factories. Following their example, Princess Elizabeth made her first radio broadcast to the children of Great Britain in 1940. Her remarkably composed broadcast is highlighted below.

_________________________________

Video Credit: British Pathé War Archives, You Tube

_________________________________

Prince George, Duke of Kent

Prince George, Duke of Kent

War, like illness, is often an inevitable equalizer among classes of people within a society, and the Royal Family did not avoid the heartache of many impacted by World War II Great Britain. Thus, at age 15, Princess Elizabeth mourned the death of her beloved uncle, Prince George, Duke of Kent. Killed in a plane crash during active duty, Prince George left his wife and three children, the youngest only seven weeks old. It is within this context of nationally shared heartbreak that Princess Elizabeth began her royal duties in earnest, named by her father Colonel of the very Grenadier Guards she hosted in her wartime home at Windsor Castle. With steeled determination and poise, Princess Elizabeth dutifully inspected her troops.

 

Princess Elizabeth changing a tire while serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service

Princess Elizabeth changing a tire while serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service

At age 16, Princess Elizabeth dutifully registered with the Labour Exchange, a requirement of all British teenagers. Eager like her peers to join the military services, the King finally acquiesced to her desire to contribute more meaningfully to the war effort. Thus, she joined the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) at age 18, becoming to date the only female member of the Royal Family in British history to serve her country in the military. A subaltern, Princess Elizabeth worked alongside her peers, learning how to change tires, dismantle and repair motor vehicle engines, and how to drive heavy military vehicles, ambulances in particular. Beyond Princess Elizabeth’s military service, she became of age to act as Councillor. Within this role, she acted as a Regent when her father was away, most notably when he made a highly top secret trip to Italy.

_________________________________

(left to right) The then Princess Elizabeth, Queen Elizabeth, Sir Winston Churchill, King George VI and Princess Margaret celebrate before and with Londoners upon the balcony of Buckingham Palace on V.E. Day, May 8, 1945.

(left to right) The then Princess Elizabeth, Queen Elizabeth, Sir Winston Churchill, King George VI and Princess Margaret celebrate before and with Londoners upon the balcony of Buckingham Palace on V.E. Day, 8 May 1945.

_________________________________

Through the shared hardship of people throughout the allied nations, along with the Grace of God, World War II ended throughout Europe on 8 May 1945. After joining her sister, parents and Prime Minister Winston Churchill upon the balcony of Buckingham Palace to greet those in celebration, Princess Elizabeth, grown from a child to a woman through the hardship of war alongside all other British children of the “Greatest Generation”, slipped outside with her sister. Together they celebrated unrecognized alongside their London neighbors, cheering their parents on to immortality.

God save the Queen. Long may she reign.

_________________________________

SOURCES:

Author Unidentified, Rare Pictures of Queen Elizabeth II Serving in World War II, Vintage Everyday: Rare Pictures.

Cohen, Jennie, 8 Things You May Not Know About Queen Elizabeth II, History in the Headlines.

Couzens, Ellen, The Queen’s War, Royal Central.

Wallace, Irving, She Did Her Bit, Collier’s Magazine, March 22, 1947.

_________________________________

Beth von Staats

Beth von Staats

Beth von Staats a history writer of both fiction and non-fiction short works. A life-long history enthusiast, Beth  is the owner and administrator of Queen Anne Boleyn Historical Writers website, QueenAnneBoleyn.com.

Beth’s interest in British History grew through the profound influence of her Welsh grandparents, both of whom desired she learn of her family cultural heritage. Her most pronounced interest lies with the men and women who drove the course of events and/or who were most poignantly impacted by the English Henrician and Protestant Reformations, as well as the Tudor Dynasty of English and Welsh History in general.

Beth’s short biography, Thomas Cranmer In a Nutshell, was recently released by MadeGlobal Publishing. A second biography, Thomas More In a Nutshell, and a full length book focusing on Henrican martyrdom are current works in process.

_________________________________

Thomas Cranmer by Beth von Staats

To Purchase Thomas Cranmer “In a Nutshell”.

Click the link below!

Thomas Cranmer “In a Nutshell”

_________________________________

The Coronation Jewels Worn by Elizabeth II, By Sandi Vasoli

September 9, 2015 in 2015 Tribute to Queen Elizabeth II, Guest Writers, Queens of World History by Beth von Staats

by Sandi Vasoli

______________________________

Queen Elizabeth II on Her Coronation Day

Queen Elizabeth II on Her Coronation Day

______________________________

Early in the morning of 6 February, 1952, this urgent report was broadcast from London by BBC News:

“His Majesty, King George VI, has died peacefully in his sleep at Sandringham House. The official announcement from Sandringham, given at 1045 GMT, said the King retired in his usual health, but passed away in his sleep and was found dead in bed at 0730 GMT by a servant. He was 56, and was known to have been suffering from a worsening lung condition.

Princess Elizabeth, who is at the Royal hunting lodge in Kenya, immediately becomes Queen at the age of 25. She has been informed of her father’s death, and is preparing to return to London, but a thunderstorm has delayed the departure of her plane. She is expected back tomorrow afternoon, when she will take the Royal Oath which will seal her accession to the throne.” (1)

Queen Elizabeth II is greeted by Sir Winston Churchill

Queen Elizabeth II is greeted by Sir Winston Churchill upon her arrival from Kenya.

Flying back to London from Kenya with her husband, Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Elizabeth was greeted by a committee of officials headed by Prime Minister Winston Churchill. The city and the country were in mourning, yet, following ancient tradition, Elizabeth was proclaimed queen on 8 February, 1952. She was 25 years of age.

Protocol required that an appropriate period of official mourning take place prior to the coronation ceremonies for the new queen. So, 16 months after the death of her father, having served that time as the reigning monarch of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Union of South Africa, Pakistan, and Ceylon, the elaborately planned and spectacular event took place. Elizabeth Windsor was crowned Queen Elizabeth II on 2 June, 1953 in Westminster Abbey. Prior to her coronation, there had been thirty-eight Sovereigns who had acceded the throne in the ancient, stunning Abbey of Westminster.

There are very few, if any, ceremonies or occasions the world over which holds equal significance and pageantry as does the crowning of a new king or queen of the United Kingdom. The fact that most of the ritual is centuries old, and has remained in place as such for close to a thousand years offers a unique and quite spectacular view into the grandeur and durability of the British monarchy. And of course, an extraordinary element of the day, with its visual grandeur and historical significance, are the jewels worn by the new monarch.

The coronation of Elizabeth II was noteworthy in that it was the first such ceremony ever to have been captured on film, and broadcast to millions of viewers the world over. Those viewers were able to marvel at the solemnity of the proceedings, and they were also offered a glimpse of the breathtaking jewels worn by Elizabeth.

Diamond Diadem

Diamond Diadem

Attired in a silk gown designed specifically for the day by the couturier Norman Hartnell, Elizabeth entered Westminster Abbey wearing the Diamond Diadem, also known as the George IV State Diadem. (2) The Diadem was made in 1820. It consists of over 320 carats, and 1,333 diamonds. Its circular base features 169 pearls. The sculpted design represents roses, thistles and shamrocks which are traditional symbols of England, Scotland and Ireland.

Coronation Necklace

Coronation Necklace

Setting off her elegant gown were the Coronation Necklace and Earrings. These pieces were commissioned in 1858 by Queen Victoria. The necklace is set with 26 enormous, perfect diamonds, graduated in size around the actual circlet, with the largest of those weighing over 11 carats. The pendant diamond is the Lahore Diamond: 22.48 carats, which had been culled from the Timur Ruby necklace of India. The earrings are pendant diamonds suspended from double studs – the pendants also taken from the Timur Ruby necklace and remade by Victoria. (3) 

Coronation Ring

Coronation Ring

During the ceremony, a symbolic ring was placed on Elizabeth’s fourth finger by the Archbishop of Canterbury. Known as the Coronation Ring, it has, since the thirteenth century, contained a ruby. Elizabeth’s ring was made in 1831 for the coronation of William IV. Its center stone is a mixed-cut octagonal sapphire, set in gold. The sapphire is overlaid with four rectangular-cut and one square-cut ruby which form a cross. The entire ring is bordered with fourteen diamonds, with a diamond on each corner. The band is gold. (4) 

Coronation Armills

Coronation Armills

At a particular stage in the coronation service, Elizabeth had placed on her arms a pair of armills – cufflike bracelets. They represent sincerity and wisdom. The pair worn by Elizabeth had been specifically commissioned for her investiture. Made of 22 karat gold, they were fashioned by Garrard &Co. and encircle the arm by way of spring clasps, with the hinges designed as Tudor roses. (5)

St. Edward's Crown

St. Edward’s Crown

The moment of crowning is the most significant, most dramatic point in the commencement of the reign of all Sovereigns of England. To signify her accession as an annointed queen, St. Edward’s Crown was placed upon Elizabeth’s head. It is made of solid gold, and was created in 1661. The current St Edward’s Crown was designed after the Restoration of the Monarchy. Legend has it that the lower part may in fact contain part of the original crown of Edward the Confessor. (6)

In the course of the coronation rite, Elizabeth, like other monarchs before her, was presented with the Sovereign’s Orb and the Sceptre with the Cross. The Orb – a gold sphere encircled with diamonds, pearls and other gemstones, and topped with a golden cross, represents the Monarch’s role as Defender of the Faith. The Sceptre, which is intended to indicate that the Monarch has temporal authority under God, is a staff which is set with the second largest diamond in the world: the Great Star of Africa, hewn from the massive Cullinan diamond. (7)

Coronation Septre

Coronation Septre

Finally, and most astonishing of all of the magnificent jewels worn by Queen Elizabeth II on her coronation day, and on other state occasions since, is the Imperial Crown. It is stunning, and what’s more, it is rich in history. Many of the stones set in the crown have mysterious and captivating histories. If the gems in this tiara could speak, oh, how legends would come to life! There are pearls reportedly having belonged to Elizabeth I (might they be the pearls which adorned her mother, Anne Boleyn’s, famous necklace?), the Second Star of Africa, the Stuart Sapphire, the Black Prince’s ruby, and St Edward’s Sapphire, which may well be over one thousand years old. Such a piece defies imagination. It is, possibly the best representation of the majesty, the mystery, and the ravishing glamour of the coronation of a new king or queen.

To hear about, and see the Imperial State Crown, watch this charming video in which Elizabeth II describes the treasure. It will leave you breathless! (8)

______________________________

Video Credit: Royal Insight (You Tube)
______________________________
Source Notes:
.

1. http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/february/6/newsid_2711000/2711265.stm

2.http://www.royal.gov.uk/LatestNewsandDiary/Pressreleases/2003/50factsaboutTheQueensCoronation.aspx

3.http://www.royal.gov.uk/the%20royal%20collection%20and%20other%20collections/thecrownjewels/overview.aspx

4.  https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/31720/the-sovereigns-ring

5. Ibid

6. http://www.royal.gov.uk/the%20royal%20collection%20and%20other%20collections/thecrownjewels/overview.aspx

7. https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/31712/the-sovereigns-sceptre-with-cross

______________________________

Meet The Author

Sandi Vasoli

Sandi Vasoli

Sandra Vasoli, author of Anne Boleyn’s Letter from the Tower, earned a Bachelor’s degree in English and biology from Villanova University before embarking on a thirty-five-year career in human resources for a large international company.

Having written essays, stories, and articles all her life, Vasoli was prompted by her overwhelming fascination with the Tudor dynasty to try her hand at writing both historical fiction and non-fiction. While researching what would eventually become her Je Anne Boleyn series, Vasoli was granted unprecedented access to the Papal Library. There she was able to read the original love letters from Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn—an event that contributed greatly to her research and writing.

Vasoli currently lives in Gwynedd Valley, Pennsylvania, with her husband and two greyhounds.

______________________________

Anne Boleyns Letter From The Tower

To Pre-Order Anne Boleyn’s Letter from the Tower, A New Assessment

CLICK THE LINK BELOW!

Anne Boleyn’s Letter from the Tower

______________________________

Skip to toolbar